Choral Directors’ Top 10: Jackie Hawley — Christmas Music for Children’s Choirs

Jackie Hawley

Jackie Hawley graduated from University of Toronto with an honors degree in Music Education and from University of Ottawa with a Bachelor of Education. She has conducted and toured internationally with adult, youth and children’s choirs and has been a clinician for choirs and schools throughout Ontario for more than twenty five years. In November of 2009, Ms. Hawley was the guest conductor for the CBC/McGill Youth Gala Concert in Montreal.

She is currently the Artistic Director of the Cantiamo Girls Choir of Ottawa, which she founded in 2003 and which grew to include a Training Choir in 2006. Cantiamo is known for its commitment to nurturing local composers and commissioning new Canadian repertoire.

In January 2008, Ms. Hawley was appointed Artistic Director of the Ottawa Children’s Choir and Music Director of its Chamber Choir. Under her artistic leadership, the choir co-produced Kaleid-on-the-Road in 2010, bringing acclaimed international artists Rajaton to Ottawa for educational and performance events that involved more than 500 people of all ages.

Ms. Hawley was also a teacher with the Ottawa Carleton District School Board, where she opened and designed the music curriculum for a new school and continues to give music leadership workshops to Board staff.

Jackie Hawley Recommends Christmas Repertoire for Children’s Choirs

Hodie Christus Natus Est

Hodie Christus Natus Est
Michael Bedford

  • This work is very accessible and quick to learn. It has an antiphonal style with a joyful opener, pleasing for singers and audience alike. Suitable for beginner level and up.

December

December
James Wright

  • A setting of wonderful poetry, this work by Ottawa composer James Wright has a lyrical melody, rich harmonies, and a beautiful piano accompaniment. It is suitable for a strong intermediate or advanced choir.

Mid-Winter

Mid-Winter
Bob Chilcott

  • A beautiful setting of a wonderful text by Christina Rosetti (In the Bleak Midwinter). This work features a moving melody and lovely piano part that is ideal for intermediate choirs and up.

I Saw Three Ships Come Sailing In

I Saw Three Ships Come Sailing In
Edward Henderson

  • A lively setting of a traditional carol, featuring a fun, jig-style piano part and contrasting “bell chime” in the middle section. Suitable for advanced choirs with divisi.

Hearth and Fire

Hearth and Fire
Willi Zwozdesky

  • A lovely piece to conclude a program, leaving audiences with warm wishes, rich harmonies, and a lyrical melody. Suitable for intermediate choirs and up.

Snow

Snow
John E. Govedas

  • A haunting piece in 9/8 time with powerful word painting in the melody and piano part. Effective use of dissonance near the end of the work. Suitable for beginners.

This Little Babe

This Little Babe
Benjamin Britten

  • A fast-poaced, exciting finale, this three-part round from A Ceremony of Carols is a masterpiece that will show off a strong intermediate or advanced choir. Interesting metaphorical text.

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening
Ruth Artman

  • A lovely Robert Frost poem with nice melodic contrasts between lyrical and rhythmic sections, interesting harmonies with smooth modulations. Suitable for intermediate level choirs and up.

Ding Dong! Merrily on High

Ding Dong! Merrily on High
Ruth Artman

  • Very simple and quick to learn, this is a fun setting with a part for glockenspiel. Simple effective harmony using canon and some vertical divisi. Suitable for a beginner choir.

Tomorrow Shall Be My Dancing Day

Tomorrow Shall Be My Dancing Day
John Rutter

  • A celebratory three-part piece that makes a great finale! An interesting variety of harmonization in different verses. Effective with piano or harp accompaniment and suitable for intermediate to advanced choirs.
Share page... EmailFacebookTwitterLinkedInPinterestGoogle+
Back to Main Blog

Leave a Reply

« « The Leading Note Guide to RCM Graded Materials for Violin | Bärenreiter Sale! » »